Gift a Miracle -November 29th

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Gift a Miracle -November 29th

Please join me as The Tiny Miracles Foundation hosts its first Holiday Shopping Event:

Gift a Miracle

November 29, 2017

1 - 9 PM

Wee Burn Country Club

410 Hollow Tree Road, Darien, CT

A VIP lunch (11:30am-1pm) featuring celebrity guest speaker, EMME, a leading presence in the fashion industry, is certain to draw many shoppers seeking unique, trendsetting holiday gifts of the finest quality.

For more information please visit: www.TTMF.org or call 203 202-9714.

The Tiny Miracles Foundation is a not-for-profit organization recognized as tax-exempt under Internal Revenue Code section 501(c)(3). Our mission is to help families of infants born prematurely in Fairfield County, Connecticut. The Tiny Miracles Foundation, Inc. (“TTMF”) is a volunteer-based organization that provides emotional support, practical assistance, supplies and information to parents of children born prematurely. TTMF does not provide medical advice or services. The contents of www.ttmf.org, our online community, our brochure, and/or other TTMF materials, services and offerings are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended, and should not be used, to replace the advice of healthcare professionals. All medical care, treatment, services, questions and decisions should be discussed thoroughly with your personal physician(s).

The Tiny Miracles Foundation is located at 381 Post Road, 2nd Floor. Darien, CT. 06820.

 

 

 

 

 

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Keep America Beautiful #DoBeautifulThings

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Keep America Beautiful #DoBeautifulThings

 

Did you know you can recycle your unused clothes and textiles at H&M and get 15% off your purchase? And, as of August 1, for every pound collected, H&M will make a donation to Keep America Beautiful! So empty out those closets and drawers before you go back-to-school shopping and help advance our fight to End Littering, Improve Recycling & Beautify America’s Communities. #BeRecycled #DoBeautifulThings     Find a store: http://hm.info/193ct

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Letter to My Teen Self

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Letter to My Teen Self

You can find the original post on Refinery29


Dear Emme,

This is a letter is a long time coming. It nags at me every day, when I chat with my 15-year-old daughter. I watch her sorting out the business of becoming a woman, absorbing the world’s messages about what that means, looking at herself through the lens of media, celebrity, and yes, her mother, too, and wondering to herself how she measures up. I want, so badly, to find the words to free her from all that comparison and worry, because I know that struggle all too well.

And then I think of you, my teenaged self, lying on your bedroom floor, tearfully wrenching yourself into a pair of Calvin Klein jeans — the ones from that Brooke Shields ad — willing them to fit and knowing they never will. Because you are not Brooke Shields. And the sooner you know that, the sooner your life as Emme will begin. What magic words could I say to convince you to get up off the floor?

Things weren’t easy in that house, I know. Your mother always on a diet, and your stepfather, obsessed with controlling his weight — and yours. In his disordered eating, he was struggling with the wounds of his own childhood, inflicting his suffering on those around him too. That’s how it works with bullies. They’ve been hurt, so they hurt others. But how could you know that then? All you knew was that, in the eyes of those who should have loved you unconditionally, your body was unacceptable.

At school, things were different. There, your body wasn’t “fat,” but strong and capable. You were an athlete, excelling at sports. You became a star rower and eventually would go to Syracuse University on a full athletic scholarship. Even then, you could not see your body for the incredible asset it was.

And no one else could see the truth either. Your coaches applauded your strength and ability, urging you to hone it — but inside you still carried those lessons learned at home. You didn’t want to be stronger; you wanted to be small. You guzzled diet soda and carefully calculated the calories of each meal, then went to practice to burn them off. Everyone praised your athletic aptitude, but really, that athleticism was the perfect mask for disordered eating.

Back then, though, people didn’t talk much about eating disorders — especially not when it came to girls who looked like you. (Years later, shortly after you begin modeling, you will take your first big paycheck and go straight to therapy. “You look perfectly fine,” your therapist will say. “Next!”)

Still, you will begin to understand that you need help. Even as you step into the world of plus-size modeling, where your body will be praised and championed — and where no one will tell you to lose weight — you will know you need help. Eventually, you’ll find the right therapist and begin to mend those wide-open wounds inflicted all the way back in your parents’ house. At last, you’ll grow into the woman I am today: a creator, a mother, an author, a speaker, and a fighter on behalf of girls just like you.

If I had the chance to knock on your bedroom door that day, and find you there, wrestling with a pair of too-small jeans, here is what I would say: It’s the jeans that don’t fit — not you. You are going to do such magnificent things with this body of yours. You’re going to use it to make love. You are going to give birth with it. It’s going to help you build a career. These are the arms with which you will hug people, the middle your children will run to and wrap their own arms around. This body is the vehicle that will carry you through the rest of the beautiful, astonishing life ahead of you. So, please, stop fighting it.

This is my earnest plea to you, and to every young person out there — because you are certainly not the only teenager lying on the floor, wishing they were different. If others aren’t giving you the respect and love you deserve, give it to yourself. Demand it. Know that all those bullies and critics are dealing with their own pain. So let them deal with it; don’t absorb other people’s problems.

And don’t try to fit yourself into someone else’s mold either. If the jeans don’t fit, don’t wear them. Find the clothes that fit your body and the life that fits you. Speak up for yourself and soon enough, those bullying voices will fade away, and you’ll find yourself surrounded by people who do treat you with respect and love, and so much more. But you have to do it for yourself first.

I wish you didn’t have to fight this battle. I wish nobody did. But I know you have it in you. So, get up off the floor, girl. Start now, the sooner the better. Look in the mirror and tell yourself, “This is who I am. Take it or leave it.” Then get out there, and tell the world.

Love,

Emme.

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We Are AMAZONS

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We Are AMAZONS

 

The moment I heard Gal Gadot was cast as lead in the epic film Wonder Woman, I couldn't wait to go and experience it.  (It’s a bonus that Patty Jenkins is the director). The reviews were coming in positive, so off I went with my 15 year old daughter Toby -- we were excited, especially after hearing Gal shot the film and all her fight scenes being pregnant. (I seriously couldn't imagine).

The film showed Diana, princess of the Amazons as this fierce, powerful and strikingly beautiful superwoman as expected but admittedly, I was hoping to see if this action film could headline Amazonian women without seeming hokey, trying too hard, or leaning on their love interest to save the day.   

I was hoping this "shero" would be able to stand on her own and shed light on the incredible strength and fortitude women play in our daily lives.  Oh and did it.

Within the first 45 minutes, I turned to my daughter and whispered "I love the writing" pointing out the play on gender roles and the silly things we do as humans out of route.  A few minutes later, I whispered again, "you know, we are amazons."  It was more a statement than a question although, my delivery was slower while contemplating the words as they came out.  I felt they were for me as for all the women I have the pleasure of calling my colleagues, friends and family. 

But there in the darkened theatre, knowing how my Toby I is gaining more and more success in her athleticism, she might soon understand the dichotomy of being a powerful woman as I did and how that power affects those and the world around her.  Engrossed in the film, she shh'ed me again and nodded, nonverbally as saying. "Yeah! duh Mom! We're amazons I got it".   I love the fact this generation embraces sheros as well amazons, as we are everywhere and in every woman.  Times have certainly changed for the better.

Seeing Wonder Woman further supported my being strong and powerful.  I am thankful for these physical and mental attributes as they served me well over my career especially having survived cancer, I most definitely feel our bodies are works of art.

While serving a greater purpose earlier in my career, my physical presence and persistence was not always easy for others in and out of the fashion industry to accept or embrace. I pushed against the norm, by just being me. Today the mold has been broken wide open and inclusion has found its place in promotions across many platforms, businesses and has a place in our culture. There seems to be a whole new spectrum of what it means to be a woman...and not just one of compliance, weakness, or servitude but of strength, intelligence, diversity. Thank GOD for this as we all gain by celebrating women in mind, body and spirit.

So if you would, raise your sword and shield before you get on with your day and proudly repeat after me: “ I am an Amazon!”, and again a little louder!! Then go slay whatever or whomever you need to and grab your daughter or group of girlfriends and see this movie if you haven’t already. You won’t regret it!

Join me and post your most righteous powerful summer Amazonian selfie and share with friends and family with the hashtag #IAMANAMAZON. Yes, I went there with my 50 + bod in one of my favorite bikinis and bathing suits to drive home the fact that we rock as women in all our powerfully diverse glory!

Follow me on all my social platforms @supermodelemme and use the #emmestyle to post pics you want me to see!

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Mindful Eating

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Mindful Eating

Mindful Eating

Have you watched the movie FED UP created by Stephanie Soechtig and executive producers Katie Couric and Laurie David? Well, I did last week and boy did it blow me away and change how I was eating!

I, along with my brother (who asked to me to watch the movie again with him) are on this high nutrition, low sugar awareness lifestyle reboot. Texting and sharing our recipe finds and new found energy levels.  It's pretty cool.  Our sister, mother of three and business owner has followed wholesome food preparation for mostly all her family's meals for over two decades and I think for the first time my brother and I really understand why!  Our health is in our grasp.

Did you know that (1) one can of COKE has approximately 39g of sugar? According to the FDA: women should not exceed 6 tsp (25 grams), Men 9 tsp (38 grams) and children 3-6 tsp (12-25 grams) per day.  (print this paragraph out and put into your kitchen)

When I got home, I went through my pantry, reading every label I could find and before I knew it, I had two garbage bags filled with foods with 5 + grams of sugar.  Did I feel guilty? Yes, but not for long. Out it went!  I am still blown away by what's been right under my nose all these years in all it's 61 different names on labelsand I thought I was a healthy eater?  

I had cancer and should have remained mindful. It can be laborious for sure.  Not always are we in the mood to cook, read labels, choose unsweetened products and foods higher in fiber. It's so easy to slip back eating on the run, grabbing what's quickest.

But the cool part of this is, I can make changes now and make better choices rolling forward, like my lie depended upon it (which it does)!  Shopping for my food the day/week ahead and making enough for two meals. (what I make for dinner will feed me lunch the next day and vice a versa.) Gone are brain fog, after lunch exhaustion, most cravings, and am excited to experience more (I'm 4 days in) while I continue with this adjustment.  Katie's cooking show, Full Plate with her husband John is fun and easy to follow for some ideas.

 

Delicious plain Greek yogurt and fresh blueberries!

Delicious plain Greek yogurt and fresh blueberries!

I'd love to hear your thoughts.  Sign up for a newsletter where you'll find recipes for the most popular meals I post on Instagram and FB.

To more mindful living!

 

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Ask Emme: Dress Code

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Ask Emme: Dress Code

Q: I was at lunch with a colleague recently when she said she had been asked by my supervisor to speak to me about the length of my skirts. Apart from the fact that I would have preferred that my boss talked to me directly, my skirts are actually no shorter than anyone else’s. I think I’m being targeted because I’m full-figured, and I’m very annoyed. How do I handle this situation?

A: Skirt lengths at the workplace should be no higher than two-and-a-half inches above the knee, no matter how divine your legs happen to be.  (I can hear a collective groan)  Call me old fashioned, but this is where I come from.  If you and your colleagues are nowhere near the ballpark, then you should all make adjustments, not just you. (but don’t count on it). Then calmly go to your boss and tell him/her that you’re disappointed that he/she didn’t approach you personally. I know that you’re feeling singled out, but now is a good time for you to step up and turn the negative into a positive. Raise the standards of your company’s dress code by lowering your hemlines and direct more attention toward your smarts and hard work.

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Ask Emme: Desperate for Marriage

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Ask Emme: Desperate for Marriage

Q: One of my best friends desperately wants to get married. She’s getting set up on blind dates, signing up on online dating sites, calling up old boyfriends and she even cut off all her hair thinking she needed a new look. Unfortunately, her efforts aren’t paying off and she’s really depressed and difficult to be around. I’ve tried to give her advice and have told her that finding a partner would be a nice plus, but her expectations of marriage after a few dates is unrealistic. Now she’s upset with me, what’s a friend to do?

A: This is a classic case of the more you try to make something happen, it won’t. You can never force love, marriage, or friendship. It has to evolve in its own time. She’s upset because she knows you’re right. I applaud you for being so diplomatic because what she’s doing is a major turnoff for any guy who comes near her. Telling her to get a life is a bit harsh, but it’s the truth. I suggest helping her understand why she is placing such urgency on being married. There seems to be something deeper going on there and I bet it’s a fear of not finding someone seeped with low self-esteem.

Only when she’s able to deeply connect and respect her truest self and true beauty that the chance of a good man will come along. Healthier to let go to faith that all is exactly the way is should be while she allows time to get her “house” in order. From there all good things flow!

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Ask Emme: A Cookie is Just a Cookie

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Ask Emme: A Cookie is Just a Cookie

Q: I have a friend who tells me what I can’t have very time we go out to eat. The last time, I wanted a cookie and she said, “What? Have you kissed size 12 good-bye to say hello to size 18 forever?” She had asked me to stop complaining about my weight, and I did… but now she does nothing but! How do I get her off my back?

A: Stop the insanity and tell her to get with it; that diets stink and eating well, is in. When you deny yourself food that you don’t eat regularly, like cookies, you crave it, and eventually overdo it the next time you bump into that goodie.

Take a page from my book.  I was quoted by Alex Witchel, which made the quote of the day in The New York Times as saying, ”A cookie is just a cookie, get over it! ”  
 

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Ask Emme: Deal Breaker

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Ask Emme: Deal Breaker

Q: I have a friend who is incredibly selfish. She never asks me about my life or my feelings and seems only to want to talk about the shoes she just bought or the makeup colors for fall. She’s the kind of person who won’t chip in the extra few dollars to cover the check, even though she’s ordered the most expensive thing on the menu. I’d like to stop being her friend, but I don’t know how. What do I say to her?

A: What a bummer! I think we all have one friend that fits this bill but why do you put yourself in the same situation over and over again not having addressed this, for the frustration? How can you be surprised by her actions if you haven’t told her your feelings and hurt you’ve become? If she’s unaware this bothers you, it will continue, even more so if she doesn’t want to change once she is faced with it.  I have a feelings she’s been like this all along. We choose our friends for various reasons: to fill a need, to learn from and hopefully, to grow independently. In this case,your expectations for your friendship have not been met and it’s now a problem for you, or have you changed in some way since you became friends? Understanding yourself  will ease some of your stress and help the needed conversation between you two, if you think it would change her behavior .  My advice is not to break off the friendship but to limit the time you spend with her and forgo any meals where bill splitting demands and seek some new friends who are less self centered and more aware!

Have a question to AskEMME or have a comment?  I’d love to hear from you below!

Join the conversation and like Emme on Facebook -  tell your friends!  You never know when Emme might be in your hometown!

 

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